2

When talking about something someone said in the past but without directly quoting, are you supposed to use the same tense the person used originally ("Батьки часто питали мене, ким я хочу бути") or make it past-tense to match the rest of the sentence like in English ("Батьки часто питали мене, ким я хотіла бути")?

1
  • I think both are acceptable. Though, the first example sounds way more common and natural to me. Aug 14, 2022 at 20:45

1 Answer 1

2

When talking about something someone said in the past but without directly quoting

In Ukrainian itʼs usually called as непряма мова «indirect speech». More info and examples you can find out on Webpen:

  1. “Мене звуть Олена Пилипівна”,— сказала вчителька. (О. Іваненко.)

    Вчителька сказала, що її звуть Олена Пилипівна.

  2. Тоді й каже Кармель мамі: “Скрізь, — каже, — скрізь, де я не піду, де не поїду, скрізь бачу вбогих людей, бідаків роботящих”. (Марко Вовчок.)

    Тоді й каже Кармель мамі, що він скрізь, де не піде, де не поїде, бачить убогих людей, бідаків роботящих.

  3. “Діду, здрастуйте!” — сказав я йому, спинившись. (О. Довженко.)

    Я, спинившись, привітався до діда.

  4. [etc.]

As you can see from Webpen, almost all examples are in this variation: you supposed to use the same tense the person used originally. The second example changes the meaning totally: that — хотіла бути — past tense to this — батьки питали — past tense, while хочу бути is present tense to this past tense.

Almost… Because some verb cases can be changed, and usually itʼs imperative which doesnʼt have a tense but an order happened in the past time.

Батьки часто казали мені: схоти бути кимосьбатьки часто [просили or other verb] мене, щоб схотіла [note: the verb changed] бути кимось.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.